Congratulations to the 2017 CS Teaching Excellence Award Winners! (Part 2)

10/03/2017

Infosys Foundation USA, Association for Computing Machinery, the world’s leading computing society, and Computer Science Teachers Association recognized 10 winners of the Teaching Excellence in Computer Science Awards this past July at the CSTA conference in Baltimore, MD.

Below are five additional award-winning teachers! Each received $10,000 for their CS teaching excellence skills.

Steven Floyd

Steven Floyd
Mother Teresa Catholic Secondary School, London, Ontario, Canada

"Computer Science (CS) teaching strategies and classroom culture need to promote student choice and autonomy. Some of our students will go on to study CS, while others can benefit immensely by being exposed to the problem solving, computational thinking and algorithm design inherent in our field. I believe these are transferable skills that students can develop in our CS classes and then use to help solve problems in a wide variety of areas."

Ray Kinne

Ray Kinne
San Diego High School, San Diego, CA

"If you were to boil computer science to its very essence you would be left with not much more than problem-solving and self-expression. These two concepts in many ways define what is to be human. I understand that for some students my class will be the first and last computer science course they will ever take. Before each class, I remind myself how important that I teach and model computational thought. The ability to break down a problem, look for patterns, design and implement solutions, will take my students anywhere they wish in life"

Robert Luciano

Robert Luciano
Pocono Mountain East High School, Easton, PA

"Cooperative logic groups can be used in the classroom to develop problem solving skills, logical thinking, communication skills, and social skills, all which are necessary to succeed in CS. By dividing a class into groups of three or four students, these logic groups work together daily to solve an interesting problem and logic and reasoning should be the main tools necessary to find the solution."

Daniel Moix

Daniel Moix
Arkansas School for Mathematics, Sciences, Arts, Little Rock, AR

"Being able to eat an elephant one piece at a time is a valuable skill whether you’re debugging a sorting algorithm, or making college plans."

Jared O'Leary

Jared O'Leary
Desert Thunder School, Tolleson, AZ

"It is fundamental for students to know how to read, predict, and debug an algorithm in order to understand how the algorithm will execute a task."