Pathfinders

Infosys Foundation USA hosted the Pathfinders Summer Institute 2018, an intensive week of in-person professional development in Computer Science and Making, at Indiana University Bloomington from July 15-20, 2018. Nearly 600 US K-12 public school teachers convened at #InfyPathfinders for high-quality hands-on training. Please review these videos and links below for recent news coverage about Pathfinders.

Stay tuned for news about Pathfinders Summer Institute 2019.

Pathfinders Summer Institute 2018 gratefully recognizes financial, material, and outreach support from:

Professional Development Options at Pathfinders Summer Institute

Art in Motion: Authentic Integration of Art and Computer Science

Grades 6-12

Since 2018

$1,998 (50% grant from Infosys Foundation USA covers first $999 for US public school teachers)

Course offered by Georgia Tech CEISMC

Program Faculty: Tamara Pearson, Georgia Institute of Technology; Katie Henry, BirdBrain Technologies


Administrator Letter of Support (Art in Motion)

Please download and follow instructions if applying for Art in Motion

Art in Motion: Authentic Integration of Art and Computer Science

Art in Motion is a project-based curriculum designed to authentically integrate computer science into art classes. Utilizing local art museums and galleries, students select inspiration pieces as the basis for moving robotic sculptures made using the Hummingbird Robotics Kit and programmed in Scratch. Students design and create their robots using strategies and processes used for any art project: sketching, journaling, revision, peer critique, etc. This program helps students, who don’t normally see themselves as part of the computer science pipeline, broaden their view of themselves as potential coders. Participants in this professional development will learn everything they need to know to be able to implement this authentic STEAM project back at their school. You will even have the opportunity to select your own inspiration piece through participating in a walking art tour of the IU Bloomington campus. Each participant who completes the professional development will walk away with their own Hummingbird Robotics Kit. No programming experience is necessary, but participants must bring their own computer.

Additional consideration will be given to schools with five or more teachers applying for this course.

Beauty & Joy of Computing CS Principles

Grades 9-12

Since 2012

$1,998 (50% grant from Infosys Foundation USA covers first $999 for US public school teachers)

Course offered by The Beauty and Joy of Computing

Program Faculty: Tiffany Barnes, North Carolina State University; Leslie Keller, North Carolina State University


Administrator Letter of Support (BJC)

Please download and follow instructions if applying for BJC

Beauty & Joy of Computing CS Principles

The Beauty and Joy of Computing (BJC) is an introductory computer science curriculum for high school students to get a broad perspective of computing and its impacts. BJC is designed to attract diverse students, including females and underrepresented minorities, by emphasizing the joy and complexity of creating visual computer programs and with critical reflection on the impacts of new computing technology. Through BJC, students will learn about core programming concepts, big data, internet foundations, as well as abstraction, creativity, and social implications of computing.

BJC is an AP Computer Science Principles course, endorsed by the College Board, and supported through NSF-funded projects at North Carolina State University, UC Berkeley, and the Education Development Center. The Snap! visual programming language and research-based curriculum prepare students for the new AP CSP exam, however, attendees are not required to offer BJC as an AP course. Computer Science experience is not required for teachers or students.

"BJC Palooza was extremely helpful for teaching AP CSP this year. My instructor, Sean, was AWESOME. He did a great job of fitting each day to what we needed. The networking/friendships made during the week have been a plus as well. I have found the bi-weekly small groups during the year a great place to get questions answered and troubleshoot classroom issues." - Kim Overman, Ponderosa High School, Shingle Springs, CA

Bootstrap:Data Science

Grades 7-12

Since 2017

$1,998 (50% grant from Infosys Foundation USA covers first $999 for US public school teachers)

Course offered by Bootstrap

Program Faculty: Emmanuel Schanzer, Bootstrap; Shriram Krishnamurthi, Brown University; Emma Youndtsmith,Bootstrap; Ed Campos, Bootstrap


Administrator Letter of Support (Bootstrap:Data Science)

Please download and follow instructions if applying for Bootstrap:Data Science

Bootstrap:Data Science

Bootstrap:Data Science teaches students (ages 12-17) to answer real-world questions using data analysis. In a world awash in information, being able to make sense of data is a critical skill for everything from public policy to molecular biology, and from software development to shipping logistics. With job openings far outstripping supply, it is crucial that students are exposed to data science in school. Writing code to crunch huge datasets is great, but learning to code must go hand in hand with being able to think, talk and write about the analysis. Fortunately, children are natural data scientists! Even children who hate school will analyze data about their favorite musicians, sports teams, or TV game shows. They care deeply about whether policies and laws are fair. A foundation in data analysis is important both for numerous later subjects of study (beyond computer science, from business to biostatistics to archeology to sociology) and for creating an educated citizenry. From examining sales data to investigating the role of the Electoral College, students are already exposed to the idea of data as a vehicle for making sense of the world through courses in Business, Statistics, and Social Studies. Bootstrap:Data Science can be taught as a standalone course, but can also integrate into these courses, providing a smooth on-ramp for teachers to build on the curriculum they already have, integrating authentic data science without having to find room in the budget for a new teacher, or room in the schedule for a new class. No teacher prerequisite.

"I am a huge proponent of Bootstrap's approach to CS Education. In Bootstrap:Data Science, my students learn by doing and learn from their mistakes. Since I started the course, I have definitely heard more “ooohs and aaahs” than usual! My students are engaged, asking questions and helping one another. It truly is a collaborative environment, and they love the class! I also can’t say enough about the behind the scenes support I have received from the Bootstrap staff. Their responses to my questions have been incredibly timely and very informative. It is so rewarding to see students engaged with learning." - CoriAnne Burgess, Kearny Science, Connections & Technology California

Code.org Computer Science Discoveries

Grades 6-10

Since 2015

$0 (Free for Indiana Teachers after 100% grant funding)

Course offered by Nextech

Program Faculty: Stephanie Zircher, Nextech; Scott Dooley, Christel House Academy; Justin Feller, Broward County Schools

Code.org Computer Science Discoveries

Indiana teachers: If you are interested in a Code.org professional learning program from Nextech, please go directly to the Code.org application located here. Please do not proceed with the Pathfinders “How It Works” application process.

The Code.org Computer Science Discoveries (CS Discoveries) course is an introductory computer science course that empowers students to create authentic artifacts and engage with computer science as a medium for creativity, communication, problem solving, and fun. Computer Science Discoveries is appropriate for 6 - 10th grade students and can be taught as a semester or yearlong introductory course (3-5 hours per week of instruction for 9+ weeks). The course takes a wide lens on computer science by covering topics such as programming, physical computing, HTML/CSS, and data. The course inspires students as they build their own websites, apps, games, and physical computing devices. The CS Discoveries program offers year-round support. It kicks off with a 5-day summer workshop where you'll have an opportunity to work hands-on with the curriculum and meet other teachers from your area. Throughout the year, we offer online support for upcoming units, forum support, and 1-day quarterly workshops. You don't need any prior computer science experience to get started. And teachers love it! 90% rank it the best professional development ever. As the Indiana Code.org Regional Partner, Nextech facilitates professional development activities for Computer Science Discoveries, Computer Science Principles, and Computer Science Fundamentals curriculum for teachers statewide. Since launching in 2015, Nextech has provided professional development for 174 licensed educators from 85 schools. We are on the forefront of the statewide #CSforIN movement, and we’d love to have you as a future partner teacher.

"Through training, we spend time in the summer learning how to use the curriculum and then we have our Saturday meetings where we refresh for the next unit. I've had an opportunity to learn a lot from other teachers that teach CS, and I've also been handed curriculum that helps guide my direction. In the Nextech training, you're building the confidence to try something new. There are a few people that have taught CS before but a lot of us are learning for the first time. We're learning that it's okay to mess up, and it’s okay if you don’t know all of the answers." Angela Jones, Northwest High School, Indianapolis, IN

Code.org Computer Science Principles

Grades 9-12

Since 2015

$0 (Free for Indiana Teachers after 100% grant funding)

Course offered by Nextech

Program Faculty: Stephanie Zircher, Nextech; Julie Alano, Hamilton Southeastern High School, Fishers, IN; Kaitie O’Bryan, Mounds View Public Schools, Saint Paul, MN

Code.org Computer Science Principles

Indiana teachers: If you are interested in a Code.org professional learning program from Nextech, please go directly to the Code.org application located here. Please do not proceed with the Pathfinders “How It Works” application process.

Code.org Computer Science Principles introduces students to the foundational concepts of computer science and challenges them to explore how computing and technology can impact the world. More than a traditional introduction to programming, it is a rigorous, engaging, and approachable course that explores many of the foundational ideas of computing so all students understand how these concepts are transforming the world we live in. The course covers many topics including the Internet, Big Data and Privacy, and Programming and Algorithms. This year-long course can be taught as an AP or non-AP course - no prerequisites required for students or for teachers. Code.org is recognized by the College Board of curriculum and professional development for AP® Computer Science Principles. Using an endorsed provider affords schools access to resources including an AP CS Principles syllabus pre-approved by the College Board’s AP Course Audit, and officially recognized professional development that prepares teachers to teach this course. The program offers year-round support. It kicks off with a 5-day summer workshop where you'll have an opportunity to work hands-on with the curriculum and meet other teachers from your area. Throughout the year, we offer online support for upcoming units, forum support, and 1-day quarterly workshops. As the Indiana Code.org Regional Partner, Nextech facilitates professional development activities for Computer Science Discoveries, Computer Science Principles, and Computer Science Fundamentals curriculum for teachers statewide. Since launching in 2015, Nextech has provided professional development for 174 licensed educators from 85 schools. We are on the forefront of the statewide #CSforIN movement, and we’d love to have you as a future partner teacher.

“Through training, we spend time in the summer learning how to use the curriculum and then we have our Saturday meetings where we refresh for the next unit. I've had an opportunity to learn a lot from other teachers that teach CS, and I've also been handed curriculum that helps guide my direction. In the Nextech training, you're building the confidence to try something new. There are a few people that have taught CS before but a lot of us are learning for the first time. We're learning that it's okay to mess up, and it’s okay if you don’t know all of the answers.” Angela Jones, Northwest High School, Indianapolis, IN

Coding as a Playground: ScratchJr+KIBO Robotics

Grades K-2

Since 2014

$1,998 (50% grant from Infosys Foundation USA covers first $999 for US public school teachers)

Course offered by DevTech research group, Tufts University

Program Faculty: Amanda Strawhacker, DevTech; Madhu Govindarajan, DevTech (supervised by Prof. Marina Umaschi Bers, Tufts University)


Administrator Letter of Support (Coding as a Playground:ScratchJr+KIBO Robotics)

Please download and follow instructions if applying for Coding as a Playground:ScratchJr+KIBO Robotics

Coding as a Playground: ScratchJr+KIBO Robotics

This professional development targets teachers working with young children K-2 who are interested in integrating computer science (CS), computational thinking (CT) and robotics into their early childhood classrooms with a playful developmentally appropriate approach. The DevTech group at Tufts University, led by Prof. Marina Umaschi Bers, has created both ScratchJr (in collaboration with Mitch Resnick’s group at the MIT Media Lab) and KIBO robotics, a robotic kit that can be programmed without screens or keyboards by connecting wooden blocks. It has also developed a pedagogical approach, called “Coding as a Playground”, teaching strategies and materials to integrate programming with other areas of the early childhood curriculum, with a special focus on literacy, creative problem solving, arts and dance. We will experience this approach through hands-on projects and model how to teach coding and robotics in an early childhood classroom. We will explore how to both take advantage of ScratchJr and KIBO for helping children think in new logical ways, but also for collaborating and developing socio-emotional awareness. Teachers who attend this PD will: Have the opportunity to become experts with KIBO robotics and ScratchJr; Learn and have access to already existing curriculum, videos and assessment materials; Develop and plan their own integrated curriculum materials; Have access to a set of program links and teaching resources at the K-2 level that include on screen, tangible and unplugged activities; Understand the pedagogical and theoretical approach by discussing excerpts from the book “Coding as a Playground: Programming and Computational Thinking in the Early Childhood Classroom” by Marina Umaschi Bers; Explore different techniques to document student’s learning trajectories; and Learn strategies for promoting home-school connections and community engagement through programming and robotics

"I learned a tremendous amount and loved being part of this community of learners and the variety of activities. It was playful and instructive, we had theory and practice and hands-on and thinking and planning ahead for how we would use this with children. This can pervade every aspect of your curriculum! I just so appreciate that we’re talking about young children, and we’re talking about young children being able to do serious work, and work hard at it—that is really powerful for me." Kindergarten teacher from Maryland

Everyday Computing: Integrating Computational Thinking into Elementary Mathematics

Grades K-5

Since 2014

$1,998 (50% grant from Infosys Foundation USA covers first $999 for US public school teachers)

Course offered by Creative Technology Research Lab at UIUC; UChicago STEM Education at the University of Chicago; Everyday Computing

Program Faculty: Maya Israel & Todd Lash, University of Illinois-Urbana Champaign; Creative Technology Research Lab; Carla Strickland, UChicago STEM Education


Administrator Letter of Support (Everyday Computing)

Please download and follow instructions if applying for Everyday Computing

Everyday Computing

This professional development targets elementary teachers interested in integrating computer science (CS) and computational thinking (CT) into their mathematics instruction. Special attention will be spent on instructional strategies and supports for academically diverse learners, including those at risk for academic failure, students with disabilities, and English language learners. We will share lessons learned and suggestions for implementing combined mathematics and CS/CT activities that teach new mathematics concepts as well as reinforce already familiar mathematics. Teachers who attend this PD will: Have the opportunity to explore integrated elementary mathematics and CS/CT activities and lessons; Use an interactive Learning Trajectories tool to aid their own integration efforts; Develop their own materials that are tied to their mathematics curriculum; Have access to a set of program links to teaching resources for integrated mathematics at the K–5 level; Participating teachers will also learn general strategies for highlighting the CS/CT that is already happening in their mathematics classes and suggestions about where to find resources to support more CS/CT in their classes. Finally, if teachers have limited experience in the Scratch programming environment (a block-based programming language for young children), they will have the opportunity to learn how to get started with Scratch.

"This professional development has been a game changer for me and my students. As a teacher, this PD helped me see new possibilities for my students! Engagement is way up and students who aren’t normally excited about math are doing way more than they did before when we integrate it with CS and CT. Being able to enter into the math content in a new way is empowering and it gives the students opportunities to creatively express what they are learning and share it with others in the classroom or around the world." Bruce Landstrom, Champaign, IL

Exploring Computer Science

Grades 9-12

Since 2008

Free + $1000 stipend (Course is free for US public school teachers after 100% funding from Infosys Foundation USA and National Science Foundation. Value of course is $1,998 + $300 for post PD support)

Course offered by Exploring Computer Science

Program Faculty: Joanna Goode, Exploring Computer Science; Gail Chapman, Exploring Computer Science


Administrator Letter of Support (ECS)

Please download and follow instructions if applying for ECS

Exploring Computer Science

Exploring Computer Science (ECS) is an introductory year-long high school computer science course focused on foundational computer science concepts and computational practices. The course was developed with National Science Foundation support to democratize computer science knowledge by increasing learning opportunities at the high school level for all students, with a specific focus on access for historically underrepresented students. The course forwards an inquiry-based model of teaching and learning across six instructional units: Human Computer Interaction, Problem Solving, Web Design, Introduction to Programming, Computing and Data Analysis, and Robotics. The robust professional development program for the ECS course takes place over two years and focuses on the focal strands of equity, inquiry, and developing CS content knowledge. The ECS program has a rich foundation of evidence-based research that establishes the program’s dramatic effect on broadening participation in computing for all students, particularly girls and students of color. In 2017-18, an estimated 50,000 students are participating in this course in high schools nationwide.

Prerequisites for teachers: In order to be eligible for ECS PD, teachers must commit to teaching ECS as a full course at the high school level in 2018-19. In addition, teachers must commit to participating in the full ECS PD experience—5 days in summer 2018, 4 quarterly ECS Online PD sessions, and 5 additional days in summer 2019.

"My PD experience was awesome! I am SO thankful to have had the opportunity to attend ECS PD week in 2017. Everything was great. The food was great. My interaction with peers was great. The dorm was very comfortable. I had an amazing roommate that I will definitely stay in contact with. My instructors were very knowledgeable and professional. The speakers during dinner were excellent. I learned more about equity, inquiry and CS concepts… I feel even more confident to execute ECS because of this PD"--HS Teacher from Georgia

Stanford’s Introduction to Logic

Grades 9-12

Since 2016

$2,198 ($1,998 + $200 for post PD support; 50% grant from Infosys Foundation USA covers first $1,099 for US public school teachers)

Offered by Stanford Logic Group

Program Faculty: Michael Genesereth, Vinay K. Chaudhri, Michael Towne


Administrator Letter of Support (Logic)

Please download and follow instructions if applying for Introduction to Logic

Stanford’s Introduction to Logic

In relation to the Computer Science Teaching Framework, the course is most closely related to Data and Analysis and to Algorithms and Programming concepts. Logic is to computer science as Calculus is to Physics, and currently, this essential mathematical training is not available to programmers being trained in the high schools. Logic also teaches critical thinking skills, and is therefore, more broadly useful to high school students who may not eventually major in computer science. Stanford’s Introduction to Logic is a freely available course that has been taught for over 25 years, and the course material has been well-received by over 500,000 students enrolling in its MOOC offering. Our course is based on Herbrand Semantics which makes this esoteric topic easily accessible to first-time learners. The topics covered include propositional logic, relational logic, deduction, and proofs. We will start by using sentences written in English. We will then talk about why we want to use a different, formal language for expressing information logically and about the rules for manipulating information sentences written in "logic". Your classes will involve learning to translate the world around you into this easy-to-master language and rules. With this PD, you will walk away with ready-to-use, engaging course materials that contains fully-developed lectures, team and individual exercises, projects, puzzles, and games that you can directly implement as a stand-alone semester-long course. (Note: The course does not require any programming. Our course is aimed at only high school teachers teaching computer science and/or math. Teachers should be comfortable with symbolic manipulation as taught in introductory Algebra and familiar with basic set theory, including set notation, union, intersection, complement. Teachers will need to have gone through the content and course material available on our website before coming to the PD in July).

"The Riverside STEM Academy reaches out to students from across our city, providing access for underserved students to STEM education. Access without rigor, however, is a hollow promise. Stanford’s Computer Science Department provided critical teacher training and engaging curriculum. This enables me to help all students improve their logical reasoning, modeling and communication skills. I want to help every student discover the power of logic and unleash their Inner Geek. The Stanford Team helps me do this! As a busy classroom teacher, I could not have developed this course to its current level of sophistication without their help. Geeks Unite!" --Michael Towne, Science Teacher, Riverside STEM Academy, Riverside Unified School District

Junior Botball Challenge

Grades K-8

Since 2013

$2,098 ($1,998 + $100 for post PD support; 50% grant from Infosys Foundation USA covers first $1,049 for US public school teachers)

Course offered by KISS Institute for Practical Robotics

Program Faculty: Carol Goodgame, KISS Institute for Practical Robotics; Anne Beck, KISS Institute for Practical Robotics; Steve Goodgame, KISS Institute for Practical Robotics


Administrator Letter of Support (Junior Botball Challenge)

Please download and follow instructions if applying for Junior Botball Challenge

Junior Botball Challenge

The Junior Botball Challenge is a Computer Science (CS) focused education program that provides equipment, software, curriculum and professional development to elementary and middle school educators (K-8) to enable them to teach their students computer science and computational thinking concepts coupled with real-life applications of the engineering design process. Attendees do not need any prior CS or programming experience. The curriculum is aligned to Common Core math, Next Generation Science and CSTA standards and vertically aligned to concepts and skills in middle and high school. The inquiry-based program focuses on discrete programming skills and engineering design concepts designed to improve computational thinking skills and promote mastery. The program is currently being successfully implemented in over 350 elementary schools with a focus on education and impacting all of the students in the classroom or extracurricular club or camp. If the teachers and students are interested they can participate in one-day public events where student teams showcase their robot designs and challenge solutions. The program is sustainable as schools can reuse the equipment allowing for continued participation. The focus on education (coding and engineering standards) coupled with the sustainability and the low cost of equipment, which includes activity mats, curriculum and professional development make it easier to target all teachers in a school and not just the STEM, gifted or technology teachers that traditionally participate in these types of activities.

"The JBC program has been a great asset to my teaching, students, school and community. I attended the professional development training with zero experience and recognized how easily I could implement this into my elementary and middle school classrooms. My students easily progresses from simple tasks to some very sophisticated challenges. The program teaches students to think using logical step-by-step processes. The curriculum builds from basic and expands to more advanced skills and critical thinking skills. What I like most about the program is students have to think, design an algorithm, write the code and then make changes to accomplish their goal." Danny Sipes, computer teacher at Thomas Middle School, Holdenville, OK

Additional consideration will be given to schools with five or more teachers applying for this course.

KCI Computer Science Crash Course

Grades 5-9

Since 2015

$1,998 (50% grant from Infosys Foundation USA covers first $999 for US public school teachers)

Course offered by Krause Center for Innovation, Foothill College

Program Faculty: Sheena Vaidyanathan, Los Altos School District; Abigail Joseph, Castilleja School


Administrator Letter of Support (KCI)

Please download and follow instructions if applying for KCI

KCI Computer Science Crash Course

Enjoy becoming a student again and fall in love with computer science. The Computer Science Crash Course for Educators will help you gain CS content knowledge and strengthen your coding skills in either Python or Scratch—you choose. Led by current computer science teachers who will demonstrate best teaching practices based on many years of experience, this differentiated course uses a variety of leveled activities and coding challenge sets to encourage middle and early high school teachers (grades 5-9) in all subject areas to advance their own learning. With K-12 CS standards-aligned lessons on algorithms, data, the Internet, and the impact of computing, you will discover that computer science is more than coding. You will also gain exposure to the many available tools and open curriculum resources that you can apply to your particular classroom needs. Topics include Programming (use of differentiated coding challenge sets to help teachers at all levels strengthen their coding and debugging skills in Python or Scratch), Algorithms (unplugged exercises to develop algorithms, understand classic sorting algorithms), Data ( representation of data for text, images, etc, use in programming projects, big data, analyzing data sets with Python code and/or spreadsheets), Networks (key concepts including IP addresses, TCP, DNS), Impact (how computers are being used and changing society), Simulations (how simulations can be used, modified, or created to model the real world), Physical Computing (learn about building and coding projects using the Micro:bit with blocks or Micropython).

“The Computer Science Crash Course was wonderfully staffed and well prepared. The course allowed for participants to step out of our teacher roles and to be students. Upon arrival, students were provided with color-coded hour-by-hour agendas. Every moment structured with thought providing insights on how to deliver quality differentiated computer programming curriculum. The course included flowcharting, coding challenges, unplugged activities, time to plan and networking. Following the course, during an elective class, I delivered coding challenges which were directly taken from the course. These challenges resulted in experienced Scratch users being gently pushed to use logical thinking skills.” -Richard Wallace, Redwood City School District, California

Note: Foothill college credit is available towards the new California Supplemental Authorization in Computer Science.

Maker Educator Collective Bootcamp

Grades K-12

Since 2017

$1,998 (50% grant from Infosys Foundation USA covers first $999 for US public school teachers)

Course offered by Maker Educator Collective

Program Faculty: Adam Maltese, Indiana University; Casey Shea, Sonoma County Office of Education; Anna Van Dordrecht, Sonoma County Office Of Education


Administrator Letter of Support (Maker Educator Collective)

Please download and follow instructions if applying for Maker Educator Collective

Maker Educator Collective Bootcamp

Introducing the Maker Educator Collective Bootcamp! Attendees do not need any prior making, computer science or programming experience. In this newly-developed program we seek to develop the skills of educators who want to incorporate making into their pedagogical toolkit. The motivation for creating this program comes from our work with numerous educators who sought guidance on the skills and resources necessary to integrate maker education principles and philosophies into their core curriculum. We designed this bootcamp based on our research and collective years of experience working with K-12 students and teachers. As we have designed it, the bootcamp intertwines skill development and discussions of maker pedagogy through participatory exercises that are designed to model many of our recommended teaching methods. Sessions will provide attendees with skills and model lessons using hands-on engineering and design challenges, digital manufacturing, microcontrollers and electronics and a variety of other inexpensive low- and high-tech materials and equipment. We will engage you in thinking about and exploring maker pedagogy related to assessment, connecting with content standards, designing for accessibility, documentation and storytelling. For those just starting the process we will walk you through the steps of visioning your goals for engaging students in making and frank discussion around how to get your program and space up and running, including budgeting for equipment, materials and maintenance. Attendees will leave with enough resources and skills to be comfortable engaging your students in making when school starts.

MIT App Inventor Middle School Jump-Start

Grades 6-8

Since 2012

$1,998 (50% grant from Infosys Foundation USA covers first $999 for US public school teachers)

Course offered by MIT App Inventor Team

Program Faculty: Hal Abelson, MIT; Josh Sheldon, MIT; Karen Lang, MIT


Administrator Letter of Support (MIT App Inventor)

Please download and follow instructions if applying for MIT App Inventor

MIT App Inventor Middle School Jump-Start

MIT App Inventor helps students harness the power of the mobile Internet to build apps that can matter to them, their communities, and even the world. In this workshop, you will learn from two former teachers now working on the App Inventor team, how to use a constructionist teaching style to introduce students to app building with App inventor and then draw back the scaffolding and facilitate student projects with themes you help determine.

"[This course was an] exceptional mix of independent prep/reading/practice mixed with collaborative application and discourse."

Mobile CSP

Grades 9-12

Since 2013

$2,298 ($1,998 + $300 for post PD support; free for the first 30 US public school teachers after 100% funding from Infosys Foundation USA and National Science Foundation)

Course offered by College of St. Scholastica

Program Faculty: Jennifer Rosato, College of St. Scholastica


Administrator Letter of Support (Mobile CSP)

Please download and follow instructions if applying for Mobile CSP

Mobile CSP

Mobile CSP provides a complete curriculum and professional development that engages students and teachers in learning the principles of computer science through building socially useful mobile apps - reaching students where they live, on their mobile devices. Students complete 6 units, each of which includes lessons on app tutorials and creative projects, big ideas in computer science, and the impact of computing. Lesson plans and a teacher dashboard are provided to easily implement the curriculum and track student progress. In 2018, a question bank will be available for assessments as well. The Mobile CSP curriculum is endorsed by the College Board for the AP Computer Science Principles course, which was the largest launch of an AP course in history. This Mobile CSP Pathfinders program will provide an overview of Mobile CSP including hands-on experience with MIT’s App Inventor, a blocks-based language for programming mobile apps. Teachers will also learn and practice inclusive and effective strategies for creating a classroom environment where all students can learn computer science. Teachers will be mentored by experienced Mobile CSP master teachers during the summer and academic year while teaching the course. Teachers will join this warm and supportive community that includes over 600 teachers and 10,000 students throughout the U.S.

Prerequisites for teachers: Teachers will need to provide their own smartphone or tablet. (Note: App Inventor currently works on Android, but should work on iOS for the 2018-19 year. If it’s not available at the time of the workshop, Mobile CSP will have Android tablets available to use during the PD.) Teachers will also need to complete about 5 hours of pre-work in our online course.

“I have worked with (other curriculums) and Mobile Computer Science Principles stands above them all. The community that they have created is amazingly supportive and always there to help others that have questions. For many instructors, they are the only ones that teach computer science at their site, but true collaboration and support is only a single click away. I can personally assure you that the curriculum created by their excellent team is truly engaging, academically solid, and aligned with the College Board. Everything you need to be successful is ready for you to use and modify as you wish.”-Ray Kinne, San Diego High School in California

Paper Mechatronics

Grades 5-12

Since 2014

$1,998 (50% grant from Infosys Foundation USA covers first $999 for US public school teachers)

Course offered by ATLAS Institute, Craft Tech Group, Univ of Colorado

Program Faculty: HyunJoo Oh, University of Colorado Boulder; Abhishek Narula, Open Source Hardware Association


Administrator Letter of Support (Paper Mechatronics)

Please download and follow instructions if applying for Paper Mechatronics

Paper Mechatronics

Come design and build machines using different kinds of paper and craft materials. We will introduce mechanical papercrafting design using our design tools and prototyping methods for physical construction. You will explore a motion library and find inspirations in the surrounding environment to invent your own machines. Combining hands-on and simulated modeling, you'll conceive a movement, then prototype a working machine, advancing to more complicated levels of design and engineering. During the studio, we'll provide papercrafting techniques and various craft materials as well as electronic components to inspire your work. Our goal is to provide a hands-on experience in the design and engineering of expressive machines with paper using our tools and techniques. The program will culminate in a show-and-tell demo and discussion about the bottom up design approaches as a means of creative thinking and learning.

"PaperMech is so neatly organized and accessible that I have since used it spontaneously to engage young robotics students during our open studio hours. They are able to make choices and get started using the technology within minutes. The creations they make are always an excellent balance of technical achievement and imagination. PaperMech is empowering students of all ages to be creators with technology rather than simply consumers of technology. Conceptually, it is leading the way in critical approaches to technology education." Zack Weaver, Boulder Library Makerspace, Boulder, CO

Project GUTS CS in Science PD

Grades 6-8

Since 2007

$1,998 (50% grant from Infosys Foundation USA covers first $999 for US public school teachers)

Course offered by Project GUTS / MIT Scheller Teacher Education Program

Program Faculty: Irene Lee, MIT Scheller Teacher Education Program; Melody Hagaman, Las Cruces Public Schools, Paige Prescott, Univ of NM, Su Gibbs, Project GUTS


Administrator Letter of Support (Project GUTS)

Please download and follow instructions if applying for Project GUTS

Project GUTS CS in Science PD

Every science classroom can benefit from the integration of computer science in science. Through the Project GUTS' CS in Science curriculum, teachers can make fundamental scientific concepts come alive through modeling and simulation and deeply engage students in computational thinking while undertaking innovative explorations of STEM concepts. The Project GUTS workshop offers interactive instruction from veteran Computer Science in Science facilitators including an introduction to computer science, pedagogy for integrating CS in Science, curriculum walkthrough, and practice with the StarLogo Nova block-based programming environment. The CS in Science curriculum features a modular design that allows for a range of classroom implementation options (10-25 hours); and aligns to national science (NGSS) and computer science (CSTA) standards The CS in Science curriculum consists of four modules that integrate computer science in the following topics: Introduction to Modeling and Simulation; Water as a Shared Resource; Ecosystems as Complex Systems; and Chemical Reactions. Supplementary online PD webinars and resources available through the Teachers with GUTS online professional development network. 96% of survey respondents recommend the Project GUTS CS in Science workshop to other teachers.

Being able to model is an essential but often overlooked aspect of science. In addition, being able to write code in some computer language is often useful or essential to many surprising careers, within the field of science and without. This Project GUTS workshop was a great introduction to both modeling and code. While you can enter with no knowledge of either, the workshop is well-differentiated, and learning can happen at almost any level. - R.Richter, Massachusetts, Project GUTS workshop attendee

Scratch Creative Computing for 3-8

Grades 3-8

Since 2011

$1,998 (50% grant from Infosys Foundation USA covers first $999 for US public school teachers)

Course offered by Code/Interactive

Program Faculty: Carlos Leon, Code/Interactive; Tom O’Connell, Code/Interactive


Administrator Letter of Support (Scratch Creative Computing)

Please download and follow instructions if applying for Scratch Creative Computing

Scratch Creative Computing for 3-8

Scratch Creative Computing is a 25-30 hour course in which students create animations, stories, and games with Scratch, a visual block-based computer programming language and teaching tool developed by the MIT Media Lab for children to create and share projects with teachers and peers through an online platform. Creative Computing is a curriculum appropriate for grades 3-8 developed at Harvard to provide teachers with ideas, strategies, and activities for an introductory computing experience. This course can be integrated into a stand-alone technology block or integrated into math, social studies, science, visual art, or language blocks.

"In my eleven years in the classroom, I’ve always been really passionate about technology. Hour of Code was really a gateway for me to discover Scratch and empower kids to just be creative. So often in schools it’s ‘here’s the handout,’ but students can’t bring that to life. They can’t make it their own. With Scratch, they can bring anything to life! A lot of the students I get in 5th grade are feeling shy about communicating in English. Scratch allows them to create in one common language—to write and to speak without worrying about vocalizing. It helps them to feel integrated into our community." Alfonso Mendoza, Harry Shimotsu Elementary School, Mission TX

The Tapestry Workshop

Grades 9-12

Since 2008

$2,098 ($1,998 + 100 for post PD support; 50% grant from Infosys Foundation USA covers first $1,049 for US public school teachers)

Course offered by Lighthouse/Tapestry

Program Faculty: James Cohoon, University of Virginia; Luther Tychonievich, University of Virginia; Leslie Cintron, University of Virginia


Administrator Letter of Support (Tapestry Workshop)

Please download and follow instructions if applying for Tapestry Workshop

The Tapestry Workshop

If you are interested in: attracting more and diverse students to your high school Computer Science classes; influencing students, parents, colleagues, and administrators on the importance of your courses and the opportunities they provide; and engaging your students in the exciting and rewarding field of computing, then you are invited to apply to attend the Tapestry Workshop on the better attraction and engagement of all students to computer science. The goals of the Tapestry Workshop are to share strategies, research-based practices, and field-tested good ideas for teaching high school computer science in a way that reaches all students regardless of sex, race or ethnicity. We help teachers understand the forces that inhibit diverse participation; learn how to overcome these forces; share best-practices with one another for recruiting more and more diverse students; identify and correct diversity-impeding practices; and make concrete actionable plans for increasing the size and diversity of their computing courses. Workshop participants explore activities for gaining the interest of all students and form a network of like-minded people for ongoing discussion and development.

"This truly is the most meaningful workshop I have ever attended. Delving into the causes of stereotype threat and then learning practical activities and actions we can do to eliminate it was so valuable. I now have the resources I need to reach out and engage ALL students in CS!" – Anonymous, Tapestry Workshop Attendee

UTeach CS Principles

Grades 9-12

Since 2014

$2,198 ($1,998 + $200 for post PD support; 50% grant from Infosys Foundation USA covers first $1,099 for US public school teachers)

Course offered by the UTeach Institute at The University of Texas at Austin

Program Faculty: Carol Ramsey, UTeach Institute; Mike Degraff, UTeach Institute; Justin Cannady, UTeach Institute


Administrator Letter of Support (UTeach)

Please download and follow instructions if applying for UTeach

UTeach CS Principles

The course does not require pre-requisites. UTeach CS Principles is an NSF-supported, and College Board endorsed, year-long high school course that addresses the seven Big Ideas and six Computational Thinking Practices specified by the College Board’s AP Computer Science Principles Curriculum Framework. It is designed for students from diverse backgrounds who are new to computing. UTeach CSP is a complete, classroom-ready curriculum that contains comprehensive teacher materials that rely on delivery models that are flexible and easy for teachers to use in a variety of high school classroom settings. The curriculum is designed to be taught using a project-based approach to engage all students, especially women and other historically underrepresented students, in the field of computer science. It prioritizes deep conceptual understanding of computer science and development of computational thinking skills rather than focusing solely on programming.

Teachers also receive year-long, on-demand implementation support by phone or email. Teachers are able to schedule virtual meetings with a teacher support specialist to discuss course questions or concerns. UTeach teacher support specialists also offer regularly scheduled, just-in-time unit webinars throughout the year. Teachers also have access to supplemental online training materials and participate in an online, moderated national community of practice where they can collaborate and share materials with other educators.

Note: UTeach CS is now offering a $1,000 stipend for teachers who apply to the Infosys Pathfinders Bloomington event, get accepted into our training, raise the matched $1099 funding (either district or DonorsCoose), and complete the full 5-day July training week.

“I never taught CS before, then went to the training over the summer, and started an AP computer science class in my school with 12 students. I went from coding ‘Rocks, Paper, Scissors,’ to winning a national contest! I remember how nervous I was in the training last summer and to be able to achieve this much this quickly has been very rewarding.”--Jason Slabodsky, Secondary School for Journalism, Brooklyn, NY

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